Tuesday, 1 July 2014

Northumbria University at Graduate Fashion Week

The Northumbia show was the last show I got to see on the Saturday of Graduate Fashion Week, and it was my favorite show overall. Here is a selection of some of the collections that really caught my eye: 

Emmie Vincent
Opening the show was noted one-to-watch Emmie Vincent with a stunning white-on-white collection. Using a variety of materials to explore fabric density, texture, matte and shine, the result was a serene range of garments that were minimal yet striking in style. Transparent tulle and silicone rubber responded fantastically to the light of the runway bringing fresh, crisp vibes to each piece. 

Anna Murphy
Yet another white-on-white collection took to the runway, however this time with a glistening insertion of silver. Laser cut leather pieces and paperclip style embellishments create a futuristic vibe, whilst low necklines, pencil skirts and crop tops add an element of femininity. 

Amy Pearson
A darker contrast to the two previous collections, Amy Pearson mixed a dark, tonal palette with gold metallic creating an image reminiscent of Autumnal leaves and petals. Draped and over sized silhouettes bring a masculine edge to the collection. 

Charlotte Grant-Mills
A menswear sports collection with an 80s vibe, Charlotte Grant Mills was inspired by the body's production of adrenaline. Pink highlights and piping imitate the color of the cells within our adrenal gland. High shine bomber jackets contribute to an over sized silhouette that contrasts with the sleek streamlined lower-half. 

Caroline Smith
One of the few swimwear collections at Graduate Fashion Week, Caroline Smith reminded everyone that it was Summer with a covetable, modern and  interchangeable Summer wardrobe. Inspired by St Ives in Cornwall, this collection is very reminiscent of 1950s resort wear. Bold colors and harbor visuals created a palette so zesty and fresh I was salivating as I watched it. 

Chloe Sanders 
Kaleidoscope prints in blue, white and black made this collection a visual masterpiece. A muted palette subtly hinted to the inspiration of the Scottish landscape and its natural elements. Silhouettes mimicked the traditional Scottish highland dress, whilst checks and graphic prints brought a punk element to the collection. 

Taja Bright
Inspired by the sense of belonging to something greater, Taja Bright used denim, knitwear and patchwork to create a nomad-style collection. Silhouettes were reminiscent of vintage work-wear, but were modernized with bandana scarf prints, bomber jackets and baggy drop-crotches. 

Esther Rigg
Taking us into the future, Esther Rigg's collection was inspired by our ever-growing knowledge of space in contrast with our lacking knowledge and understanding of the oceans on our planet. A blue, silver and black palette brought the two worlds together alongside geometric prints and space-suit style silhouettes.

Ciara Artt
Inspired by the regeneration of Belfast and the community divisions that still exist, Ciara Artt used innovative pattern cutting and contemporary digital printing to create garments and silhouettes that reflect armored vehicles and body protection. 

Rachel Jefferson
If I was to ask you to imagine a womenswear collection inspired by Margaret Thatcher, I'm sure the conjured image wouldn't be all that fetching, let alone something you'd find at Graduate Fashion Week. Rachel Jefferson however has proved us all wrong and put powerful women in politics on the fashion map. Strong, over sized yet relaxed silhouettes hark back to the Margaret Thatcher days, whilst imagery of graffiti and street art and the reworking of traditional woven cloths into prints add a modern edge. Experimental layering of a range of textures from wool and leather to silks and foil bring a deconstructed grunge element to the collection. 

Katrina Wagster
Inspired by Roma travellers, Katrina Wagster mixes traditional tailoring with contemporary pattern cutting. Distressed 1930s style work wear such as heavy black work boots contrasted with a range of soft, light textures that added femininity. 



Thursday, 19 June 2014

University of Salford at Graduate Fashion Week

 The University of Salford was the third show on the first day of Graduate Fashion Week, and set itself apart from the rest from the very beginning with a strong and passionate manifesto about feeling alive in an age of the internet and materialism. I can only assume the intention behind this speech was to encourage the audience to view this show from a different perspective to which they'd viewed the others. It seemed that the students had taken the manifesto on-board themselves, with experimentation and contemporary twists featuring strongly in the show. So here are just a few of my favourites: 

Caroline Corby
A classy revamp of the velvet tracksuit, Caroline Corby works a nude palette with splashes of fluorescent yellow onto basketball jerseys, velvet tracksuits and peek-a-boo bodysuits. The odd appearance of sheer fabric brings a holiday vibe to the collection. 

Naomi Valentine
A playful collection of holographics, metallics, sequins and tassels created a visual treat. Focusing on contrasts, this collection featured two main showdowns: the metallic versus the matte, and the boxy versus the ballooned. The strong presence of loose fitting garments teamed with huge flatform trainers brought hard urban vibes to a rather feminine colour palette. 

Rosie Singh
Restricted 90s silhouettes in gold and black foil made for a strikingly sleek and elegant collection reminiscent of Kate Moss. 

Gemma Kearins
This collection could very easily have been taken from the wardrobe of Tilda Swinton when she played the White Witch. Crisp whites in the form of crochet, embroidery anglaise, sheer leggings, skinny jeans and long haired fur skirts created a textural wonderland and brought a contemporary twist to the traditional fairy-tale look. The sharp wire crowns and the giant flatform trainers worked to create a tall, thin silhouette. 

Hester Haywood
This was a simplistic, bohemian collection featuring lightweight materials in the form of unstructured, minimalist garments reminiscent of Amish attire. Colours of white, blue and grey made for an ethereal palette. 

Leanne Hardacre
An austere collection with attitude. Strict lines contrasted with sheer flowing fabrics in the forms of maxi skirts and capes whilst austere pleats and hints of underwear as outerwear added a feminine edge. 

Samantha Clegg
Gold foil, black sequins and bat wings teamed with 3D florals created an impish, mystical collection. 

Nayani Fernando
A collection of elegant and urban streetwear featuring a monochrome palette in the form of maxi dresses and jackets. Sheer panels and baseball caps contributed an urban an sporty edge.

Iqra Rashid
Stealing the entire show, Iqra Rashid's collection featured a modernist twist on the traditional Arabic niqab headscarf. Tented silhouettes and concealed faces featured lively patterns in reds, blues, creams and blacks. The bright red tights worn over shoes were the finishing touch to a collection packed full of the contemporary. 

Ellen Wilson
Refreshing would be the perfect word to describe this collection. Unusual silhouettes were constructed out of sharp, angular lines whilst crisp whites and aqua blues were paired in a variety of ways. The gingham check skirt was one of my favourites.